The Church

St Michael’s Parish Church

St Michael’s is in regular use as the village parish church and is available for weddings and other religious occasions.

This picturesque and historic church is situated on the main drive to the Manor when approaching from Chenies village. The present church dates from the late 15th and early 16th centuries, replacing the earlier, mainly wooden church dating from the 12th century when the village was known as Isenhampstead.

Following a period of disrepair in the 18th century, a major period of repairs and amendments was begun in 1829 by Lord Wriothsley Russell, rector for 57 years. This involved the closure of the church for part of the 1830s, during which time Lord Russell’s father, the 6th Duke of Bedford allowed the Long Room in the Manor House to be used for services.

The exterior walls had their flint facing reworked in the 1860s.

Inside, there are many items of interest, from the fine 12th century ‘Aylesbury’ style font and medieval brasses, through to the Victorian windows and beyond.

The Bedford Chapel

Not normally open to the public, though visible through the glazed screen in the church, the Bedford Chapel, contains what the architectural historian Nickolaus Pevsner described as, “as rich a store of funeral monuments as any parish church of England”.

Further details about the church and chapel can be found at www.cheniesbenefice.org, by contacting the Parish Office on 01923 284433, or email cheniesrectory@aol.com.

Leading from the manor drive is the church of St Michael, the village parish church, in regular use and venue for various activities. The present church dates from the late 15th and early 16th centuries, replacing the earlier, mainly wooden church dating from the 12th century when the village was known as Isenhampstead.

Following a period of disrepair in the 18th century, a major period of repairs and amendments was begun in 1829 by Lord Wriothsley Russell, rector for 57 years. This involved the closure of the church for part of the 1830s, during which time Lord Russell’s father, the 6th Duke of Bedford allowed the Long Room in the Manor House to be used for services.

The exterior walls had their flint facing reworked in the 1860s.